Ballet With the Ball: A Love Story

women's world cup, FIFA
Originally published by John Lanchester, National Geographic, June 2006

Why do we fall in love with soccer? What happens?

At some deep level, the reason soccer snags us is that good soccer is beautiful, and it’s difficult, and the two are related.

A team kicking the ball to each other, passing into empty space that is suddenly filled by a player who wasn’t there two seconds ago and who is running at full pelt and who without looking or breaking stride knocks the ball back to a third player who he surely can’t have seen, who, also at full pelt and without breaking stride, then passes the ball, at say 60 miles an hour, to land on the head of a fourth player who has run 75 yards to get there and who, again all in stride, jumps and heads the ball with, once you realize how hard this is, unbelievable power and accuracy toward a corner of the goal just exactly where the goalkeeper, executing some complex physics entirely without conscious thought and through muscle-memory, has expected it to be, so that all this grace and speed and muscle and athleticism and attention to detail and power and precision will never appear on a score sheet and will be forgotten by everybody a day later–this is the strange fragility, the evanescence of soccer.

It’s hard to describe and it is even harder to do, but it does have a deep beauty, a beauty hard to talk about and that everyone watching a game discovers for themselves, a secret thing, and this is the reason why soccer, which has so much ugliness around it and attached to it, still sinks so deeply into us: Because it is, it can be, so beautiful.


women's world cup

The 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup is finally here!

Canadian Living magazine went behind the scenes with the Canadian national women's soccer team. From superstitions to pre-game food to the musicians they rock out to (you won't believe who!), here are the secrets to team Canada's success.

How do you celebrate a win?
“Usually by singing Celine Dion … After one of our big wins last year, or a couple of years in the Cyprus Cups, we had the stereo system in the locker room and we popped in Celine Dion and started singing at the top of our lungs. And that’s usually, as a team, what we do. If anybody walked by they’d think: What a bunch of crazy Canadians. I can’t sing worth anything, but I am singing at the top of my lungs.”
– Goalkeeper Karina LeBlanc, 31 years old, from Maple Ridge, B.C.

“A lot of dancing, music … (and, after a tournament) Celine Dion’s Power of Love, that’s a good one.”
– Forward Melissa Tancredi, 29, Hamilton, Ont.

“Usually in the locker room we end up singing some kind of Celine Dion song … You can thank Karine LeBlanc for that one.”
– Forward Christine Sinclair, 27, from Burnaby, B.C.

women's world cup

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever gotten from a coach?
“Just to be confident in my own skill and my own ability and just to believe in myself. As a girl growing up you’re not expected to be boisterous or look into yourself and be who you are, it’s always like ‘stay in the back, be a team player.’ For a coach to come up to you and say ‘you’re better than you think you are,’ and to push it out of you is the best advice I’ve ever gotten.”
– M.T.

The team’s pre-game rituals
“Music is a must. And, for me, when I put my shin guards on and my cleats, and even when I get my ankles taped, it’s always left side first …”
– M.T.

More of the team’s pre-game rituals
“Left to right: you’ve gotta put on everything from left to right (when getting dressed for the game). And definitely say a prayer. I always say a prayer right before I enter the field and during the national anthem.”
– K.L.

“I always have to make sure my laces are tied extremely tight before a game. If they’re too lose it sets me off.”
– Forward Jonelle Filigno, 20, from Mississauga, Ont.

women's world cup

Favourite pre-game meals
“My pre-game meal is always a big plate of pasta.”
– J.F.

“Pre-game it’s usually plain, simple pasta. Especially with an Italian as a head coach, she’s all about the pasta and the crostata before a game.”
– C.S.

“Actually a lot of us have been taking these goo packets, which are supposed to be a lot of simple sugars right before we play and they taste like chocolate icing, so they’re delicious.”
– Midfielder Diana Matheson, 27, from Oakville, Ont.

Post-game snacks
“Post-game, right away we have Parmesan. It’s gonna sound weird to people but Parmesan is what I look forward to. Parmesan is the first thing we eat in the locker room, as weird as that sounds. I’m a cheese-lover, too, so it works.”
– M.T.

“Certain members of our team are obsessed with Parmesan cheese. I’m not quite there: It’s hard for me to want to stick a brick of Parmesan cheese in my mouth after a game!”
– C.S.


As a Canadian owned and operated company, with hotels in both Canada and the UK, Sandman Hotel Group is excited to cheer for both Team Canada and Team England. Who will you be cheering for?

Click here for a full tournament schedule.

World Cup, women's world cup, FIFA

New Year’s Resolutions – Did You Make Them Realistic?

Travel Quote

Gulliver traveled. Look where it got him: lashed to the land by little people. Columbus, big traveler, right? Underestimated the circumference of the Earth and died thinking he’d found India. Sure, you can come up with justifications for never leaving the splendid safety of your office chair. Truth is, travel makes us better in many ways: better employees, better family members, and better friends.

Every year, the month of January makes us say things like: Out with the old; in with the new. It may be cliché, but every year, we say it. That may be because there’s something about the beginning of a new year that automatically sparks a desire to make a change or start something fresh. But instead of making a new year’s resolution that is unattainable, why not find something you will be able to achieve and enjoy at the same time.

iphone 5 cameraHow about learning how to actually use your camera? (Remember that there is a camera on your phone, so this applies to all smart phone users as well.) Our resident social media guru put together these five simple tips to help kick start your camera knowledge.

Number 1: Get to know your camera/phone functions. You don’t want to be fumbling with controls and missing moments.

Number 2: Turn your flash off for nightscapes. Flash can only travel a few feet, so there is no way it’s going to help you with that Vegas-by-night shot. Find a stable place to sit the camera, like a portable tripod or even a curbside newspaper box.

Number 3: Use flash in the sun. Try turning on the flash when you’re taking portraits of each other in harsh sunlight. It sounds odd, but flash will actually fill in the heavy shadows caused by the sun, giving you more even light and color.

Number 4: The landscape mode on your camera is designed to give you sharp pictures from a distance, along with rich blue skies and lush earth tones. Flip to this mode when you need it, and let the camera do all the work.

Number 5: Don’t always rely on zoom lenses to get you close to the action. Walk right up to your subject, interact with them, and get details that fly-by tourists would miss in their haste.

photo collageNow that you know how to use your camera, let’s put your new knowledge to use. And there’s no better way to test your camera skills than to go on a trip. Think about the amazing adventures, delicious food, and the beautiful photos you will take. Exciting!

There’s only one thing left to do. Plan the trip.

Why? Because the pleasure of pre-trip anticipation is invigorating. It’s why puppies are more joyful than dogs.

Pros to planning now: A vacation begins the second you start to plan it. Travelers’ moods improve as soon as the planning begins, even before the actual vacation starts.

Cons: Running out of toner the second you try to print your boarding pass. Trying to remember where you put the digital luggage scale. Rushing out to buy batteries for that digital luggage scale.

Canadian TravelSo where will your new adventure take you? If you’re looking to travel within Canada, your choices are endless.

Canada’s cities are energetic, multi-cultural, and most importantly, distinctive.  You don’t drive from one to the other expecting the same.  Vancouver and Victoria’s lifestyles are always relaxed, and while it may be wet, it doesn’t stop people from enjoying the natural surroundings of each city.  Booming Calgary and Edmonton reap the benefits of our natural resources.  Regina and Saskatoon proudly bring vibrancy to the prairies.  Winnipeg is a definite cultural centre at the heart of the country. Toronto and Ottawa are the corridors of business and politics.  Montreal enjoys a reputation as the coolest city in the country, if not the continent, while the streets of old Quebec City feel like they’ve teleported from Europe.  The history is everywhere in Halifax and Charlottetown, and the charm thick in Fredericton. In Newfoundland, St John’s witnesses the first sunrise of the continent, and its brightly painted houses as animated as its people.  Let’s not forget Whitehorse, Yellowknife, and Iqaluit, our vibrant outposts of the Great White North.

Whatever your new year’s resolution might be, whether it be travelling or learning how to use your camera, Sandman looks forward to spending time with you in 2014!

Sandman Celebrates Winter in Winnipeg

Cute Snowman

Sweeping prairie skies, vast fields and cold winters are often the stereotypes that come to mind when people think of Winnipeg, Manitoba. However, there are many other associations Canada’s seventh most populous city is famed for too. For instance, it is called the ‘cultural cradle of Canada’, a ‘cosmopolitan city with an innovative arts scene’ and a place that’s ‘home to a diverse community where more than 100 different languages are spoken.’ Suffice to say, there is a lot to see and do here – especially during the winter season.

Why is winter so great in Winnipeg? Well, quite simply because Winnipeggers are famed for making a big celebration of the season (you don’t get monikers like ‘Winterpeg’ and the ‘Christmas Capital of Canada’ for no reason). A huge part of the city’s culture and environment is shaped by the snowy time of year, and one look at the exciting events lined up for the coming months is sure to prove that.

What’s Happening in Winnipeg This Winter

Winter Fun at The Forks

Yes the prairie fields are abundant here, but so are the rivers. Specifically, The Forks National Historic Site, located at the junction of the Assiniboine and Red Rivers, is one of the most famed river sites in the nation all year round. An integral trading and meeting place for citizens and visitors for over 6,000 years, the site has been a hub for early traders, hunters, settlers, railway pioneers and, nowadays, more than four million visitors annually.

During the winter visitors can enjoy the Arctic Glacier Winter Park with 1.2 kilometres of skating trails, a toboggan run, the skate-through Great-West Life Snowman Lane or the professionally designed Snowboard Fun Park. Just make sure you check their website: www.theforks.com for updates as many of the attractions are weather dependant or are under construction.

Christmas with the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra

December 7 – December 9, 2012

With tons of performances throughout the season, the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra is the perfect place to take in some of the best yuletide spirit in town. If you’re in the mood for some caroling, check out their ‘WSO Pops: Barenaked Ladies – Hits and Holiday Songs’  as one of Canada’s most famous bands performs their hits along with popular Christmas carols.

Festival of Trees and Lights

Since 1988, this event has brightened up Winnipeg by letting citizens and companies decorate trees or wreaths that are raffled off for a good cause. Since its inception, the festival has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for local charities with all decorated trees and wreaths displayed in the centre of downtown Winnipeg.

November 27 – December 9
Festival du Voyageur

February 15 – February 24

As Western Canada’s largest winter festival, the Festival du Voyageur is a non-stop family-friendly event that draws in visitors from around the country. Celebrating Canada’s fur trade history with historical exhibits, shows, and entertainment, this is a distinctly Canadian experience. Held in Winnipeg’s French Quarter, you can expect to see beard, jigging, fiddling, and Louis Riel lookalike contests in addition to snow sculptures, food festivities and more. It’s guaranteed to be a 10-day province wide celebration of heritage, culture and joie de vivre!

Canada’s Royal Winnipeg Ballet

December 20 – December 30

Perhaps the most famed performance for the holiday season, ‘The Nutcracker’ is a must-see for any dance enthusiast. Performed by Canada’s legendary Royal Winnipeg Ballet, you can see the popular fairytale performed by the nation’s best ballet stars.
Whether you’re in the city to visit historic buildings and landmarks, or to experience the diverse and exciting arts scene, Winnipeg is most certainly a must-see winter wonder this season – especially if you’re looking for some snowy fun!

To book a stay a Sandman Hotel & Suites Winnipeg Airport, to see current Hot Deals, room rates and more, click here: www.sandmanhotels.ca/hotels/winnipeg/