March Break Slide In the City

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“Spring is nature’s way of saying, ‘Let’s party!'” ~ Robin Williams

Spring comes but once a year, and it comes with a rebirth of flora, warmer weather, and a week (or two) dedicated to enjoying the change.

As far back as history has been recorded, people have celebrated the arrival of Spring—including the ancient Greeks and Romans, who were all about self-indulgence. Of course, those rowdy crowds centered their jamboree on their respect for Dionysus or Bacchus, the Greek and Roman gods of wine. But what we now know as Spring Break really began because of two events: When Fort Lauderdale built Florida’s first Olympic-size pool in 1928, and when MGM released Where The Boys Are in 1960.

College Coaches' Swim ForumFort Lauderdale’s pool, considered mammoth at the time, brought the nation’s top competitive swimmers to the city during their break from classes, and by the late ’30s, more than 1,500 student athletes were flocking to the city’s College Coaches’ Swim Forum. The first of these forums was hosted in 1938, and droves of college swimmers made Fort Lauderdale their exclusive Spring Break home well into the ’60s. By that time, non-student athletes began to take part in what these swimmers had created; Time first mentioned the phenomenon in their 1959 article titled “Beer & the Beach.”

Where The Boys AreA year later, MGM released Where The Boys Are, a coming-of-age film that followed four college women during their spring vacation. And just like everything in a postmodern society, reality reflects art. Spring Break became a very real thing for any collegiate male or female who wanted to escape to sand and sun. In 1986, MTV launched its first Spring Break special in Daytona Beach, Florida, and found an annual tradition in showing what really happens on this mid-semester get-away.

By the end of the ’80s, the city that first made Spring Break famous—as evidenced by the 370,000 students who invaded in 1985—said it had had enough of the raunchy and unruly guests it had invited all those years ago. The city adopted stricter public drinking laws, and then-mayor Robert Dressler went on Good Morning America to say that Spring Breakers weren’t welcome anymore. Of course, by that time, there were plenty of other cities hosting their own annual parties—ensuring that Spring Break is a tradition that won’t die out anytime soon.


Mississauga PoolPlanning on visiting Mississauga this March Break?

Stay at Sandman Signature Mississauga Hotel and enjoy a family-filled getaway sure to keep your kids busy and happy.

With an indoor, heated swimming pool and 3-storey waterslide, let your kids splash around while you relax poolside with your favourite book. What a perfect way to let your children blow off some steam!

Book now before this deal slides away.

Book Dates: now – March 21, 2015
Stay Dates: March 13 -21, 2015

Rate:

  • March 13 – 14, 19 – 21, 2015: starts at $139
  • March 15 – 18, 2015: starts at $149

Includes:

  • Accommodations
  • Access to indoor pool & 3-storey waterslide
  • Complimentary continental breakfast for up to 4 people per night (based on 2 adults and 2 children under 16 years of age)

For more information, click here. See you this spring!

Terms & Conditions: Rates based on two (2) adults and two (2) children under the age of 16 sharing accommodations. Subject to availability, taxes, and applicable fees. Cannot be combined with other offers. Blackout dates and other restrictions may apply. New bookings only.

Childhood Unplugged

Written and photographed by Sharalee Prang – guest blogger

spring break: bringing shrieks of joy… or pain across the nation.  i love my kids.  i really really do.  and i like the idea of spring break.  the reality of spring break, though, can be less than ideal, especially with young kids.  the ideal: let them stay up late for popcorn and a movie as a treat so that they will sleep in the next morning.  the reality: they stay up late and whine when they have to go to bed, even when it’s an hour past their regular bedtime.  the next morning they are up even earlier than usual, are grumpy, fight with each other nonstop and shoot you death glares when you suggest an afternoon “quiet time”.

so even though we didn’t have big plans to go away this year, we threw together a last minute one night “staycation” at sandman hotel & suites squamish.

squamish, here.we.come.

family vacation | sharalee prang photography_616family vacation | sharalee prang photography_615family vacation | sharalee prang photography_617family vacation | sharalee prang photography_619family vacation | sharalee prang photography_618another family showed up after we had been there a few minutes, so i put my camera away so that i didn’t look like a creepazoid. but i could have shot inside there all day.family vacation | sharalee prang photography_620on our way home, following google maps, i looked for the road that cut closest to the water and we ended up here. thanks google!family vacation | sharalee prang photography_621family vacation | sharalee prang photography_622family vacation | sharalee prang photography_623family vacation | sharalee prang photography_624family vacation | sharalee prang photography_632family vacation | sharalee prang photography_625family vacation | sharalee prang photography_626family vacation | sharalee prang photography_627family vacation | sharalee prang photography_628family vacation | sharalee prang photography_629family vacation | sharalee prang photography_630family vacation | sharalee prang photography_631family vacation | sharalee prang photography_633

a couple of polaroids from our little advenutre:squamish2squamish

Sharalee Prang is a lifestyle wedding and portrait photographer from British Columbia. She lives in a little town called Yarrow, but can also be found driving across the country with her husband and three kids in an RV or tucked away in the corner of the best coffee shop your city has to offer. She likes using natural light to creating authentic portraits of families and people in love.

Roses and candy and love.. Oh my! Happy Valentine’s Day!

Heart of RosesLove: it’s something we all crave. We are wired to not just need it but to want it too.

The English language only has one word assigned to convey multiple meanings of love. We use “I love you” with family, friends, and with the person we are in a relationship with.

It’s easy to understand what love for family means. The bond created by blood is intense and can never be broken.

It’s also easy to understand what love for friends means. This is a love that you choose to give. It is when you are so close with your friend you view them as if they are part of your family. You have an emotional connection with that person and you never see them not being part of your life.

But what does it mean when you tell your boyfriend, girlfriend, husband, wife, or partner that you love them? And more specifically, what does it mean to be in love? Clearly there is a difference between the two as we have all heard people say that they love someone but aren’t in love with them.

Instead of trying to figure out the meaning of love, we decided to let these adorable children explain it.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Sandman’s Tribute to Fathers

Father & Son Golf

What does it mean to be a dad?

Most fathers would probably cite the same qualities — and employ much of the same language — if asked that very question. Most would say a dad provides. A dad protects. He tries to teach, often by example, if only because so many fathers still embrace the “strong, silent” stereotype, and so many dads find that showing rather than telling can frequently be a more eloquent method for imparting a lesson.

In fact, of all the familial “hoods” — motherhood, childhood, fatherhood — the latter has probably changed less, in fundamental ways, than the others over the last several generations. Motherhood is largely unrecognizable (in many positive ways) from the institution of, say, the 1950s, while childhood sometimes seems to be redefined with each new alarmist magazine cover: Our kids are too lazy! Our kids are too busy! Our kids are too coddled! Our kids are too stressed!

Father-and-Son

But fatherhood? For the most part, today’s dads are still good-natured. Much as their fathers and their fathers’ fathers did before them, maybe a little more “enlightened,” more “sensitive,” more “attuned” than their old men, but generally working on the same basic principles: Raise good kids. Don’t spoil them. Help them stand up. And, every once in a while, let them fall down. Love them, guide them — and then, as painful as it’s going to be — let them go.

From all of us at Sandman, to Bob Gaglardi, founder of our company, and every dad out there, Happy Father’s Day.